The Angel Clark Show With Einer Elhauge Plus Parks and Recreation, Why Cops Want Your Text Msg. And More

Posted on Posted in Podcast, The Angel Clark Show

Segment 1,2 Report: Cops Want Wireless Carriers To Save Text Messages, You Know, Just In Case That thing you texted to that person the other night which you deleted out of overwhelming shame the next day? Messages like that could be pored over in the future by cops if various law enforcement officials have their way. They’re reportedly asking Congress to make wireless carriers record and store customers’ private text messages for at least two years, in case police need that info for a future investigation.

CNET says it’s learned of a bunch of law enforcement groups who have given the U.S. Senate a proposal that would require wireless companies to hang on to Americans’ text info, because the fact that there isn’t such a law now “can hinder law enforcement investigations.”
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Segment 3 IRS blamed in massive South Carolina data breachSouth Carolina’s governor faulted an outdated Internal Revenue Service standard as a contributing factor to a massive data breach that exposed Social Security numbers of 3.8 million taxpayers plus credit card and bank account data.
Gov. Nikki Haley’s remarks on Tuesday came after a report into the breach revealed that 74.7 GB was stolen from computers belonging to South Carolina’s Department of Revenue (DOR) after an employee fell victim to a phishing email.
People who filed tax returns electronically from 1998 on were affected, although most of the data appears to be after 2002, Haley said during a news conference.
South Carolina is compliant with IRS rules, but the IRS does not require SSNs to be encrypted, she said. The state will now encrypt SSNs and is in the process of revamping its tax systems with stronger security controls. She said she has sent a letter to IRS to encourage the agency to update its standards to mandate encryption of SSNs.
The lack of encryption and strong user access controls plus dated 1970s-era equipment made DOR systems ripe for an attack, she said.

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Segment 4

Couple Faces Fines Of $97K For Using Own Driveway
Howard and Lisa Gray have been involved in a six year dispute with Clearcreek Township in Warren County, Ohio over the use of a driveway that they obtained permission from the Clearcreek TWP official. Now, because of complaints of neighbors the couple faces nearly $100,000 in fines and contempt of court charges.

The Grays on storage and landscaping businesses and their land extends across two counties. They were using their residential driveway in Warren County to get to buildings on the Montgomery County portion of their land. The buildings house their storage and landscaping businesses.

After obtaining permission to use their own driveway on their own land from the bureaucracy of Clearcreek TWP, neighbors began complaining to the TWP and they ordered the couple to stop using their driveway to access their business.

Attorney for the Clearcreek TWP in a court filing last Monday said, “We realize that, several years ago, (the Grays) were given bad advice. That in no way excuses their current behavior, which is to continuously ignore and, in fact, thumb their noses at the court’s orders.”

Wait, what? Bad advice?

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Segment 5 & 6 The Angel Clark Show With Einer Elhauge Talking About His Book Obamacare on Trial About The Author:
Einer Elhauge is the Petrie Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and founding director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics. He served as Chairman of the Antitrust Advisory Committee to the Obama Campaign. He teaches a gamut of courses ranging from Antitrust, Contracts, Corporations, Legislation, and Health Care Law. Before coming to Harvard, he was a Professor of Law at the University of California at Berkeley, and clerked for Judge Norris on the 9th Circuit and Justice Brennan on the Supreme Court. He received both his A.B. and his J.D. from Harvard, graduating first in his law school class.

He is an author of numerous pieces on range of topics even broader than he teaches, including antitrust, public law, corporate law, patents, the legal profession, and health law policy. His most recent books include: Obamacare on Trial (2012), available at www.amazon.com; Research Handbook on the Economics of Antitrust Law (Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. 2012); The Fragmentation of U.S. Health Care: Causes and Solutions (Oxford University Press 2010); Statutory Default Rules (Harvard University Press 2008); U.S. Antitrust Law and Economics (Foundation Press 2011); Global. Antitrust Law and Economics (Foundation Press 2011); and Global Competition Law and Economics (Hart Publishing 2011).

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Segment 7
Man Pushed to Death on Subway TracksA 58-year-old subway passenger was killed on Monday after he was pushed onto the tracks of an onrushing train in Manhattan by a man who had been mumbling to himself as he walked along the platform, the police said.

The passenger, identified by the police as Ki-Suck Han of 52nd Avenue in Queens, tried to climb back onto the platform but did not make it; he was struck by a southbound Q train in the 49th Street station. He was pronounced dead at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital, the police said.

The assailant fled and remained at large on Monday night, the police said. Paul J. Browne, the Police Department’s chief spokesman, described the attacker as a black man in his mid-20s in a tan shirt and black pants who was carrying a black jacket and wearing a woolen hat.

On Monday night, two police officials and a priest were seen escorting a woman believed to be the victim’s wife from a Queens apartment to a van. They made no comment to reporters outside.

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Segment 8 Parks and Recreation‘: Newt Gingrich, Christie Brinkley and why the cast is in Indianapolis A compendium of news and previews for “Parks and Recreation.” If this were a regular feature, it would be called All the Bacon and Eggs We Have.

– The show has snagged another cameo by a politician, though unlike those of Vice President Joe Biden and Sens. Barbara Boxer, John McCain and Olympia Snowe, this one was unplanned. “Parks and Rec” is doing some location shooting in Indianapolis this week, and Monday (Dec. 3), former House Speaker Newt Gingrich walked into the restaurant where the show was filming.

A quick meeting among the crew, including showrunner Mike Schur, led to a brief cameo for Gingrich. “It was a completely random chance,” Schur tells the Indianapolis Star. “But you can’t pass up on an opportunity like that.”

– So what’s the show doing in Indianapolis? Get ready for a possible spoiler … READ MORE

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